Private: 2014 Program

THURSDAY

*Handout links can be found under session descriptions. Not all speakers submitted handouts.

Download Thursday Schedule and Descriptions.

 

8:30 am Plenary Sessions

Prevention

Drug Use in Pregnancy: Mother and Child

Ira Chasnoff, MD, President, Pediatrician
Children’s Research Triangle
Prenatal exposure to illicit drugs can produce structural and functional changes in the fetal brain, resulting in newborns with multiple risk factors for long-term development. This session will explore neonatal health and neurodevelopmental consequences for infants whose mothers have used illicit drugs during pregnancy and provide an overview of maternal and child intervention strategies that can promote neonatal development and enhance safety for the child.
Handouts Not Yet Submitted

Workforce/Integration

How to Prepare Your Agency for Telehealth: A Decision Matrix

Michelle Padden, MSW, LCSW, LADC, CASAT
Nancy Roget, MS, MFT, LADC, CASAT
Many insurance plans approve the use of telehealth services. Yet, a 2009 study found addiction treatment providers in fewer than 16 states reported utilizing telehealth. This workshop will introduce administrators to telehealth including: trends/outcomes/reimbursement/costs; technologies; and an agency-focused telehealth decision matrix.
Handouts Not Yet Submitted

Treatment

Treating Trauma in Adolescents and Adults

Patrick DeChello, Ph.D., LCSW, MSW, RPH
D&S Associates

Very few things can affect an individual as much as being a victim of trauma. Children, because of their naturally diminished capacity to comprehend, verbalize and understand abstract concepts and metaphors, are at a great disadvantage when it comes to processing and understanding trauma. Trauma-based disorders, while considered to be acute disorders, are often chronic and enduring. In fact, post-traumatic stress disorder is a chronic disorder, often requiring multiple interventions over extended periods of time.

The consequences to a traumatic experience can occur on three levels: Physiological, psychological and behavioral. The results can be changes in neurochemistry; behaviors that are designed to numb or avoid re-experiencing the trauma, such as substance abuse; obsessive compulsive behaviors and/or psychological issues such as  PTSD, anxiety or a host of other psychological problems. Current research indicates that both children and adults experience a trauma which later becomes manifest in a myriad of pathologies, such as addictions to drugs and alcohol, food, sex, self-injury and many more. This conference will explore this in both the child and adult development and offer practical input on effective treatment strategies.
Download the Handouts

    Recovery

    Relationship Detox: Helping Chemically Dependent Clients Develop Healthy Relationships in Recovery

    Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, Professor
    Governors State University
    Relationships are the leading cause of relapse among chemically dependent clients. In this interactive, skill-building presentation, participants will receive tools that will enable them to help their clients develop healthy relationships in recovery. A partial list of topics includes: 10 Characteristics of Healthy Relationships; 10 Characteristics of Addictive Relationships; The Impact of Abandonment on the Development of Emotional Intelligence; Relationships and Relapse Prevention; Strategies for Helping Clients Leave Toxic Relationships; Relationship Detox: Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships in Recovery; and Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships through the Engagement and Termination Phases of Counseling.
    Download the Handouts

    10:30 am Breakout Sessions

    Prevention

    The Mystery of Risk: Drugs, Alcohol, Pregnancy and Long-Term Outcome of the Child with Prenatal Exposure

    Ira Chasnoff, MD, President, Pediatrician
    Children’s Research Triangle
    Alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs used by a pregnant woman readily cross the placenta and can produce structural and functional changes in the developing fetal brain. These biologically-based risk factors are complicated by the fact that these children also often suffer from high rates of violence in the home and endure significant trauma early in childhood. The health consequences for these children are enormous, but the implications for mental health, behavior and learning are even greater. This session will explore the biological and environmental factors that impact the ultimate development of substance-exposed children who suffer early trauma and provide an overview of maternal and child intervention strategies that can promote long-term growth and development of the child.
    Handouts Not Yet Submitted

    Prevention

    Suicidal and Non-Suicidal Self-Harm Behaviors in Adolescent Substance Use Disorders (Part 1)

    Fred Dyer, Ph.D., CADC, Consultant/Trainer/Author
    Self-Employed
    Suicide deaths and suicidal behaviors among adolescents are a significant public health burden. They often occur in the context of treatable mental health and substance use problems, are associated with a large number of productive years lost to society, and significantly impact the lives of suicide survivors, often in traumatic ways. Non-lethal suicide behaviors are associated with increased risk for additional non-lethal suicidal behavior and increased rates of suicide death and are major reasons for child psychiatric hospitalizations and emergency room presentations. Non-suicidal self-harm behavior has also been an area of increasing public health concern and appears to be related to significant psychological distress among young people. Research has indicated that the relationship between alcohol or substance abuse and self-harm behavior is complex. 

    This workshop will review the possible relationships between substance abuse and suicidal or non-suicidal self-harm behaviors, the epidemiology of self-harm behaviors, and parent and family factors as well as other vulnerability and resilience factors for self-harm. This workshop will also discuss considerations in assessment, screening, and treatment of self-harm and future directions for research regarding self-harm occurring in the context of substance abuse.
    Handouts Not Yet Submitted

    Criminal Justice

    Changing Criminal Behavior Through Evidence Based Practices

    Carey Welebob, MA, BA, Division Director
    Texas Department of Criminal Justice
    During this session, the speaker will address the implementation of evidence-based practices in Community Supervision and Corrections Departments (CSCD) by making practices and programs such as motivational interviewing, EPICS, etc., a part of the Texas Department of Critical Justice’s (TDCJ) overall organizational culture. The director of TDCJ will also address the challenges of implementing evidence-based practices and ways different jurisdictions have overcome these obstacles.
    Download the Handouts

    Tobacco Cessation

    Integrating Tobacco Cessation into Mental Health Treatment

    William T. Wilson, Dr.PH., LPC, Director of Health Promotion and Wellness
    Austin Travis County Integral Care
    Individuals who face the challenges of mental illness smoke approximately 44 percent of all the cigarettes purchased in the United States and die about 25 years earlier than the general population from smoking-related illnesses. Most individuals who have mental illness are not even assessed for tobacco use or offered treatment and many are treated by clinicians who smoke and who believe that individuals who have mental illness should not be treated for smoking because some clinicians think it harmful. Learn about this and other myths, what successful programs are doing and how to get started at your treatment organization.
    Handouts Not Yet Submitted

    Treatment

    Good Grief!: Helping Clients Cope with Loss

    Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, Professor
    Governors State University
    This interactive, skill-building workshop will prepare participants to help clients cope with the wide range of losses they experience, including: Parental abandonment; ambivalent deaths; unspeakable deaths; separation/divorce; the end of an addictive relationship; loss of custody of children; evictions; loss of dreams; loss of employment; deterioration in physical functioning; the loss that accompanies giving up alcohol and other drugs; the loss of dreams that accompanies acknowledging mental illness; termination from counseling, which can lead to flight and regression; etc.

    A partial list of topics covered include: Grief Counseling; Types of Losses Clients Grieve; How To Do a Grief Inventory; Addressing Unspeakable Deaths and First Degree Grief Secrets; Personal Characteristics of Effective Grief Counselors; Gender Differences in Grief Work; Story Telling as Grief Work; The Stages of Grief and the Role of the Counselor; Helping Clients Remember Rather Than Forget As Grief Work; Creative Strategies for Helping Clients Cope with Loss; and The Termination Phase of Therapy with Clients as Grief Work.
    Download the Handouts

    Treatment

    Family Strength-Based Services: Nurturing Program and Effective Model and Curriculum for Working with Children, Youth and Families

    Sonya Thorn, MSW, Founder/Owner
    PRAXIS
    The Nurturing Program is recognized by SAMHSA & NREPP for being an effective evidence-based program with a proven track record of successful interventions working with children, youth, and parents. Nurturing Parenting Programs bring us 30 years of field-testing and success, while reminding us that old-school parent intervention can hurt more than help. They have a built-in assessment tool that allows professionals to measure parent progress with objective results, which can be used to design services, and they meet and exceed the six protective factors identified by the government for the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect.

    In this session, clinical practitioners will learn how to:

    • Increase parents’ empathy as a means to decrease reactivity and family violence.
    • Teach parents how to meet their needs while at the same time understanding and effectively meeting their children’s needs.
    • Equip parents with skills to discipline with dignity and respect.
    • Assess the degree of trauma effecting parents and children and provide effective trauma-informed intervention.
    • Facilitate and support their clients’ growth in emotional regulations as well as their own as professionals in the frontline. 
    • Effectively utilize techniques and strategies with the most challenging behaviors (child, youth, parent, staff).
    Download the Handouts
     

    Treatment

    Mental Health Peer Support in Our Jails, Hospitals, and Under-served Populations

    Adam Slosberg, ACPSS, Executive Director & Mental Health Peer Support Case Manage
    Beyond Today
    Joshua Schwass, LCDC, Certified Peer Specialist
    Austin Travis County Integral Care
    Shannon Carr, Executive Director
    Austin Area Mental Health Consumers
    Mental Health Peer Support is one of the fastest growing sectors in the mental health funding arena. This presentation will provide its history and its much needed involvement in our criminal justice system as well as our underserved communities including the Latino, African-American and Asian communities in Austin and elsewhere.

    This presentation will also discuss the economic impact of mental health peer support by attempting to gauge the cost of providing support and services versus the city, county, state and federal costs of maintaining an individual on various forms for social assistance. The benefits of mental health peer support, combined with an integrated recovery process, can lead individuals to lead healthier and more self-sufficient lives.

    Through discussion and role play of mental health peer support attendees will see that stigma persists; in the form of mental health issues, as well as in cultural behaviors and traditions. These former items are monumental blocks to providing effective support. Mental health peer support is a form of support in addition to clinical oversight and acts as a catalyst for the prevention of subsequent health issues.
    Download the Handouts

    Counseling Essentials

    Law and Ethics in Clinical Practice (Part 1)

    Patrick DeChello, Ph.D., LCSW, MSW, RPH
    D&S Associates
    Resources and staffing are limited. As a result, clinicians are doing far more than ever before. Today’s clinician is confronted with many legal and ethical issues on a daily basis. Understanding and navigating through the maze can be disheartening and confusing. Clinicians often make decisions about what to do without appropriate guidance or knowledge that puts them at risk.

    The purpose of this seminar is to assist participants in understanding how legal and ethical practice affects treatment outcomes and can increase or decrease liability. A review of ethical scenarios based on actual practice will afford the participant to understand the practical application of the laws and ethics that govern practice.

    Since every discipline has its own code of ethics, clinicians are often left to interpret them as they apply to practice. Generally, federal law supercedes state law unless the state law is in compliance with the federal law and stricter. This seminar will cover both state-specific information as well as federal law. Client rights, HIPPA standards, Tarasoff, standard practices, ethical application of the laws and treatment criteria, suicide assessment, abuse/neglect, commitments, police protective custody, crisis teams, clinician impairment and limitation of liability are all issues covered in this workshop.
    Download the Handouts

    Workforce

    Ion’s Web Integrating Child and Adolescent Mental Health into Primary Care Practices (Part 1)

    Stephen Barnett, MD, MSHA, FAAP, FACP, Pediatrician & School/Community Health Consultant
    Self-Employe
    Mahdieh Bodaghi, MD, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow
    UT Southwestern
    Clayton Travis, MSSW, Mental Health Policy Fellow
    Texans Care for Children
    Today, primary care offices are awash with infants, children and adolescents with mental/behavioral health problems that require recognition and care. They show up at the office because it is a trusted source or because other attempts to get help have failed. These physicians, despite having multiple strengths to address these issues, feel overwhelmed and unable to help. Their attempts at timely referral often fail.

    This presentation will provide an approach for primary care practices to implement over time and successfully address these issues with quality of care. Many therapists and professionals in mental health are often asked (or would like to know) just how this care can be rendered in these practices. Simply putting a therapist in an office room and asking them to take care of all the practice’s mental and behavioral health issues by themselves will not work.

    By presenting and discussing course objectives, participants will have a foundation on which to begin working with a primary care practice and provide access to quality mental health care to the many children and their families in need.
    Handouts Not Yet Submitted

    1:30 pm Breakout Sessions

    Community Building

    Strengthening Your Coalition through E-Membership

    Casey Boyle Eldridge, M.Ed., President
    CBE Educational Services, Inc.
    Coalitions can expand membership and participation in their coalition work by incorporating into their bylaws, policies and procedures for E-Membership.

    This workshop will provide participants with a brief overview on the power and value of E-Membership. The primary focus will provide a guideline for the design and development of increasing coalition representation and participation on regular basis. In addition, participants will have an opportunity to examine a sample Memorandum of Agreement relevant to E-Membership commitment and voting.
    Download the Handouts

    Prevention

    Suicidal and Non-Suicidal Self-Harm Behaviors in Adolescent Substance Use Disorders (Part 2)

    Fred Dyer, Ph.D., CADC, Consultant/Trainer/Author
    Self-Employed

    See description for Part 1 above. Should take both Part 1 and 2.
    Handouts Not Yet Submitted

      Criminal Justice

      Houston Chronic Consumer Stabilization Initiative (CCSI)

      Facilitator: Nnenna Ezekoye, Policy Analyst
      Department of State Health Services
      Panelists: Glenna Garcia, LPC, NCC, Program Manager
      Critical Time Intervention, Chronic Consumer Stabilization Initiative, Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County
      Mike Lee, Lieutenant, Support Operations – Mental Health Unit
      City of Houston
      Ann MacLeod, LPC-S, NCC, Program Director
      Crisis Intervention Response Team, Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County
      Lawrence Pate
      City of Houston
      The Chronic Consumer Stabilization Initiative (CCSI) is an innovative, proactive, collaborative community policing program partnering the Houston Police Department with the Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority (MHMRA) of Harris County. Together, the agencies work to keep individuals with serious and persistent mental illness from continually going into crisis.

      The Mental Health Unit identifies the most chronic and persistent mentally ill consumers the department responds to continually. Two clinicians from MHMRA work with the consumers in an effort to keep them out of crisis. Since its inception, the program has maintained an overall 47 percent reduction in the number of encounters with the Houston Police Department, as well as an overall 47 percent reduction in the number of Emergency Detention Orders issued for these encounters. Attend this session to learn more about this program.
      Download the Handouts

        Tobacco Cessation

        Tobacco Addiction is Treatable

        Barry Sharp, MSHP, MCHES, Coordinator
        Tobacco Prevention & Control Program
        Texas Department of State Health Services
        Individuals with mental health and substance abuse issues smoke at more than three times the prevalence as the general public and account for more than 44 percent of cigarettes consumed. In addition, this group of smokers dies 25 years earlier on average than non-smokers and account for nearly half of the tobacco related deaths annually. Clinicians, for the most part, are often reluctant to address tobacco use with their clients, but this can be changed. 

        The Texas Department of State Health Services has free resources for clinicians using nationally recognized protocols, tracking tools and patient education materials to implement the Ask-Advise-Refer model for treating tobacco dependence. This session will provide an overview of current tobacco threats, resources available to clinicians to battle tobacco abuse among their clients and co-workers, and hands-on training to put those tools to use.
        Download the Handouts

        Treatment

        Drugs, Alcohol, Pregnancy and Infant Mental Health: It’s All About Relationships…

        Ira Chasnoff, MD, President, Pediatrician
        Children’s Research Triangle
        There are conflicting reports as to the impact on the young infant of prenatal exposure to maternal alcohol or illicit drug use. However, although studies consistently document that global measures of infant development are normal, new research is revealing the more subtle impact of prenatal exposure on the infant birth to three years of age. This session will explore the maternal infant relationship in the context of women who have histories of chemical dependence, examine regulatory functioning in the young infant, and introduce strategies for early intervention for the mother and child.
        Handouts Not Yet Submitted

          Treatment

          Trauma Informed Care: An Understanding and Techniques for Effectively Working with Families in Their Own Homes

          Sonya Thorn, MSW, Founder/Owner
          PRAXIS
          This workshop will explore the day-to-day challenges of keeping families emotionally connected and engaged after they have been affected by traumatic events in their lives. This workshop is useful for any worker and their leadership who provide services to families in their homes and participants will learn techniques to empower families. The workshop will include basic assumptions and goals for family-based services and practitioners to understand professional boundaries and the difference between sympathy and empathy.
          Download the Handouts

          Recovery

          The Dance: Engaging the Faith Community in Prevention and Recovery

          Drew Brooks, BA, Executive Director
          Faith Partners, Inc.
          Dnika Travis, Ph.D., Research Fellow
          University of Texas School of Social Work
          For many individuals, religion and spirituality are important components of prevention, treatment and successful recovery from substance abuse. Working with the faith community, like learning to dance, can involve stepping on toes. The Faith Partners model, using the strategic prevention framework and stages of readiness, has moved congregations from rare conversations about substance abuse to active involvement in community prevention and recovery support activities. 

          Permission to openly discuss alcohol and drugs, without automatic judgments, is the hallmark of a healthy and healing congregation. Conversations about alcohol and drug use, misuse and addiction are often infrequent and uncomfortable in most congregations. Though addiction disease strikes with equality individuals and families of every faith, every culture, every income level and every community, a subtle taboo keeps the subject in the closet until a crisis occurs.

          An informed clergy, supported by committed and trained members of the congregation can serve their congregational community as part of a recovery-oriented system of care. It takes a careful and well planned process to start an effective lay team ministry to address the whole congregation. This interactive workshop describes a model to work with the faith community in an effective and sustainable way. 
          Download the Handouts

            Counseling Essentials

            Law and Ethics in Clinical Practice (Part 2)

            Patrick DeChello, Ph.D., LCSW, MSW, RPH
            D&S Associates

            See description for Part 1 above. Should take both Part 1 and 2.
            Download the Handouts

            Workforce

            Ion’s Web Integrating Child and Adolescent Mental Health into Primary Care Practices (Part 2)

            Stephen Barnett, MD, MSHA, FAAP, FACP, Pediatrician & School/Community Health Consultant
            Self-Employed
            Mahdieh Bodaghi, MD, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow
            UT Southwestern
            Clayton Travis, MSSW, Mental Health Policy Fellow
            Texans Care for Children
            See description for Part 1 above. Should take both Part 1 and 2.
            Handouts Not Yet Submitted

            3:30 pm Closing Keynote

            Pleasure Unwoven

            Kevin McCauley, MD, Co-founder
            The Institute for Addiction Study

            “Addiction begins as a disorder of genes and pleasure and ends as a disorder of choice." – Kevin McCauley

            Attend the closing session for a journey that could well change your life! Despite extensive neuroscientific evidence, patients, their families, employers, and policy makers still have a hard time accepting that addiction is a disorder of the brain and not just the result of bad choices. With a speech that will include clips from his award winning DVD "Pleasure Unwoven" Dr. Kevin McCauley will take attendees still deeper into the issues raised in his film, with expanded explanations, fill-in features to personalize the material, and topics for discussion.
            Download the Handouts